Check Point Blog

Welcome to the Check Point Blog where you will find posts tagged in two categories:

  • Threat Research: Research findings, threat intelligence, and perspectives from Check Point’s research teams
  • Security Insights: Perspectives on current events and the security landscape from Check Point thought leaders


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WannaCry – Paid Time Off?

 
Let us open with a TL;DR – DO NOT pay the ransom demanded by the WannaCry ransomware! Now, let us explain why: As of this writing , the 3 bitcoin accounts associated with the WannaCry ransomware have accumulated more than $33,000 between them. Despite that, not a single case has been reported of anyone receiving their files back. The decryption process itself is problematic, to say the least. Unlike its competitors in the ransomware market, WannaCry doesn’t seem to have a way of associating a payment to the person making it. Most ransomware, such as Cerber, generate a unique ID and bitcoin wallet for each victim and thus know who to send the decryption keys to. WannaCry, on ...

Global Outbreak of WannaCry

 
On May 12, 2017 the Check Point Incident Response Team started tracking a wide spread outbreak of the WannaCryp ransomware. We have reports that multiple global organizations are experiencing a large scale ransomware attack which is utilizing SMB to propagate within their networks.  To complicate matters there are a number of different campaigns ongoing so identifying specific infection vectors has been a challenge. For WannaCry the infection vector appears to be direct infection utilizing SMB as delivery method. Samples have been identified by Check Point Research Teams that contain variant “killswitch” domains and bitcoin addresses. All tested samples have been detected and ...

JAFF – A New Ransomware is in town, and it’s widely spread by the infamous Necurs Botnet

 
Necurs, one of the largest botnets, went offline during the holiday period of 2016 and through the beginning of 2017. However it returned only to shortly peak late in April, spreading Locky using malicious PDF documents. Today, May 11, Necurs started spreading a new ransomware called JAFF. Check Point’s global sensors have spotted as many as 40,000 emails in the last few hours, at an infection rate of approximately 10,000 emails sent per hour. Image 1: The JAFF ransomware ransom note (courtesy of MalwareHunterTeam)   Necurs has the reputation for being one of the 'best' malware distributors. In the past, it helped Locky and Dridex reach millions of victims, making them ...

DiamondFox modular malware – a one-stop shop

 
Check Point researchers have conducted a thorough investigation of the DiamondFox malware-as-a-service in collaboration with Terbium Labs, a Dark Web Data Intelligence company. The report includes a review of the malware’s sales procedure and customer reviews, as well as a full technical analysis of its multiple plugins. For the full DiamondFox report click here. Check Point Threat Intelligence teams constantly track the latest attack trends, campaigns and attack methods to maintain an up-to-date and  accurate view of the cyber threat landscape. In recent years, an effective new business method has penetrated the thriving malware and attack tools market and led to the establishment ...

Android Permission Security Flaw

 
Check Point researchers spotted a flaw in one of Android’s security mechanisms. Based on Google’s policy which grants extensive permissions to apps installed directly from Google Play, this flaw exposes Android users to several types of attacks, including ransomware, banking malware and adware. Check Point reported this flaw to Google, which responded that this issue  is already being dealt with in the upcoming version of Android, currently dubbed "Android O".   Technical Background: In Android version 6.0.0, dubbed “Marshmallow”, Google introduced a new permission model for apps. The new model consists of several groups of permissions, with permissions considered as ...

The Devil’s Bargain: Security or Productivity?

 
With so much riding on cyber security, those of us charged with providing it must make a devil’s bargain between conflicting priorities: maintain productivity by letting users receive and transmit information quickly, or protect information at the cost of unacceptable latency. The dilemma arises from the nature of today’s threats. In the original threat-signature model, which is still valid, threat actors distribute malware, which honeypots and other sensors around the Internet pick up and pass to security analysts. The analysts quickly generate the threat signatures antivirus and intrusion-prevention systems use to block threats. Security vendors update malware signatures in their ...

Debug Instrumentation via Flash ActionScript

 
Browser plug-ins have always been an attractive target for attackers to exploit. In the last couple of years, the most prevalent attack platform was undoubtedly – Flash. With 250+ CVEs in 2016 alone, and incorporation in practically every exploit kit, Flash exploits are everywhere and deserve our attention. As researchers, we stumble upon many cases where we are required to analyze exploits found in the wild and collect as much information as possible regarding the exploit`s internal workings. This process quite often proves to be tedious and very time consuming, making the research task far from optimal. As most of an exploit’s juicy parts (such as ROP chains, Shellcodes and ...

Update – OSX/Dok Campaign

 
Our ongoing investigation of the OSX/DOK campaign has led us to detect several new variants of this malware. These new variants have the same functionality as the previous ones, and are designed to give the attackers complete access to all victim communications. This includes communication encrypted by SSL, by redirecting the victims’ traffic through a malicious proxy server. Following Apple's revocation of the previous developer ID, it appears that the attackers have quickly adapted and have begun using a new Apple developer ID. The attackers seems to have quickly adapted to Apple’s revocation of their previous developer ID, by signing these new variants with a new developer ...

GDPR – here’s what you need to do right now

 
By now you may have heard of GDPR, the new European General Data Protection Regulation.  It’s a complex, and evolving piece of legislation that comes into effect in May 2018.  It doesn’t matter whether your organization has any presence in the EU, or where your applications and data are processed and stored.  If your organization holds or controls any data about an EU citizen, then you need to start thinking about being compliant with GDPR … and the sooner, the better. Simply put, GDPR requires companies to implement entirely new processes and procedures around the collection and storage of personally identifiable information (PII).  It defines PII as any information that ...

Getting your emails blocked? Don’t forget the semicolon;

 
Due to their common use in websites, JavaScript files are not detected by traditional Anti-Virus software. Scanning JavaScript files while browsing is virtually impossible due to its performance impact and probable high false positive rate, due to most sites using obfuscated JavaScript as a benign method to protect their intellectual property. To detect such attacks, the contextual data is needed. If you let the Anti-Virus “know” that the source of the JavaScript is email based, it can  overcome the mentioned limitation and block the JavaScript. This was the case with Gmail, which recently (in February) changed the allowed sent or received attachment policy to block JavaScript ...