The Judy Malware: Possibly the largest malware campaign found on Google Play

 
Check Point researchers discovered another widespread malware campaign on Google Play, Google’s official app store. The malware, dubbed “Judy”, is an auto-clicking adware which was found on 41 apps developed by a Korean company. The malware uses infected devices to generate large amounts of fraudulent clicks on advertisements, generating revenues for the perpetrators behind it. The malicious apps reached an astonishing spread between 4.5 million and 18.5 million downloads. Some of the apps we discovered resided on Google Play for several years, but all were recently updated. It is unclear how long the malicious code existed inside the apps, hence the actual spread of the malware ...

The mobile banker threat – from end to end

 
One of the most dangerous threats targeting mobile users is the banking malware. These malicious pieces of code are designed to steal financial information and transfer funds to their own accounts. Over the years, perpetrators successfully managed to overcome all obstacles set before them, such as the 2-Factor-Authentication security mechanism and defenses set in different Android versions. Surprisingly enough, mobile banking malware require relatively little technical knowledge to develop, and even less to operate. All the malware does is search for a banking app on the infected device and pop-up a fake overlay page once the user opens it. The user enters his credentials, which are sent ...

Android Permission Security Flaw

 
Check Point researchers spotted a flaw in one of Android’s security mechanisms. Based on Google’s policy which grants extensive permissions to apps installed directly from Google Play, this flaw exposes Android users to several types of attacks, including ransomware, banking malware and adware. Check Point reported this flaw to Google, which responded that this issue  is already being dealt with in the upcoming version of Android, currently dubbed "Android O".   Technical Background: In Android version 6.0.0, dubbed “Marshmallow”, Google introduced a new permission model for apps. The new model consists of several groups of permissions, with permissions considered as ...

Check Point Infinity – The Security Architecture of the Future – Today

 
Infinity is boundless.  Unfortunately so are your IT demands and security expectations.  The explosion of new technologies promising simplification, untold efficiencies and cost savings are only creating uncertainty, complexity and risk. There needs to be a force to unify and harness the promise of these new technologies for the benefit of business operations and customers.  Welcome to the future of cyber security, Check Point Infinity.  Check Point Infinity is the first ever consolidated, security architecture across networks, cloud and mobile providing the highest level of threat prevention.  The days of ineffective, disparate, point product security constructs are ...

The latest findings on Chrysaor (Pegasus for Android) are even more stealthy

 
Earlier this week Google published a research about a new sophisticated spyware tool for Android, believed to be related to the Pegasus malware for iOS, which was discovered in August 2016. As Google wrote in their blog, the malware was most likely created by the authors of Pegasus – the NSO group, and shares many common features as Pegasus. What’s the big news? Chrysaor is a fully developed spy tool for Android devices, and can allow attackers to surveil their targets’ every move. Chrysaor has implemented elaborate modules to listen in on conversations, take screenshots and surveil the device’s surroundings, steal sensitive data and read SMS messages. This malware presents a ...

Google’s annual Android security report illustrates Check Point’s dominance in mobile threat defense research

 
Google published its annual security report yesterday for the Android ecosystem. The report includes many commendable efforts by Google to improve the security of users, and fight back against the raging surge of malware. One of the major actions Google has introduced this year was working alongside security vendors to eradicate malware from the ecosystem, a task Check Point was happy to contribute to. 70% of the malware Google cites in the report was discovered and brought to the public attention by Check Point’s mobile security researchers. This is a good indication of the major role played by Check Point's researchers in protecting the entire mobile ecosystem, while identifying and ...

Three Key Takeaways from WikiLeaks’ Release of CIA Documents

 
The latest revelations by WikiLeaks, collectively called the “Vault 7 Leak”, have caused quite a commotion in the security world, reinvigorating myths that were previously viewed as theoretical. There are already several lessons to be learned from WikiLeaks’ most recent data dump, and we offer you three top takeaways from the initial document disclosure.   1. Every connected device can be hacked The publication details exploitation techniques for all sorts of electronic devices: from PCs and laptops, to mobile devices, and even to Smart TVs and connected cars. While these techniques are not groundbreaking, the sheer scope of hackable devices revealed in the CIA trove is ...

Preinstalled Malware Targeting Mobile Users

 
Check Point mobile threat researchers recently detected a severe infection in 36 Android devices belonging to a large telecommunications company and a multinational technology company. While this is not unusual, one detail of the attacks stands out. In all instances, the malware was not downloaded to the device as a result of the users’ use, it arrived with it. According to the findings, the malware were already present on the devices even before the users received them. The malicious apps were not part of the official ROM supplied by the vendor, and were added somewhere along the supply chain. Six of the malware instances were added by a malicious actor to the device’s ROM using ...

Android: the Perils of Popularity

 
Despite the long lines you see stretching from stores when a new iPhone comes out, Android phones rule. According to IDC, Android’s market share hovers at over 80 percent while iOS has a market share in the teens. Android’s popularity — and vulnerability to attacks — arise from Google’s decision to make Android an open OS. Being an open OS lets many manufacturers make devices that can run Android. However this leads to OS fragmentation when several vendors each release several models over several years resulting in thousands of active versions of Android. This wouldn’t be a big deal except each version has software vulnerabilities that must be patched. At best, it can take ...

The SMISHING threat – unraveling the details of an attack

 
  On January 26, a new smishing attack targeted users in the Czech Republic. Smishing, or SMS phishing, is a vector attackers use to send SMS messages from supposedly legitimate organizations.  These messages persuade users to download a malicious app, to provide private information like bank account or credit card details, or to click on a malicious URL. In this campaign, the attackers masqueraded as Czech Post, the Czech postal service to get users to download a malicious app containing a full-scale Trojan horse. Once users click the link, they are led to a fake Czech Post web page with a seemingly legitimate address. From there the malware downloads and installs immediately ...